July 2017 RPG Blog Carnival – Mutant Monsters

 

They shouldn’t have existed, mistakes of nature and mistakes of humanity!  These abominations were the accidents as a result of careless experiments and deadly warfare.  And the result?  Worse than we could have ever feared.  Confused, angry, resentful, hateful!  These things seek to destroy both their creators and the world around them.  Much like the forces that spawned them, destruction is usually their goal.  But, these creatures are no villains, but the consequences of arrogance, apathy, discrimination and violence.

Author’s Note: As a continuation of my theme, here’s a plethora of horrible mutants and mad experiments.  While much of it is revisiting old monsters, there’s a good amount of new goodies to toss into your wastelands, super secret labs and other such locations.
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July 2017 RPG Blog Carnival – Post-Apocalyptic House Rules

Most creations of the apocalypse are accidental.

The end of the world happened as we expected, too many people squabbling over too many things.  And with their super weapons, a new breed of terror was unleashed.  Not only did the radiation spread, it became aware, it gained its own life.  And what followed?  I dare not say…  All that is certain is the horrors of this war spawned all of them.  Protect yourself at all costs, should you run into such a mockery of life.

The post-apocalypse, a staple of darker science fiction.  There are few greater fears than not only one’s own death, but the death of the world we live in.  Or at the very least, the death of civilization.  In most cases, we wouldn’t have roaming raiders, so much as starved out and depressed barbarians.  But, since science fiction gives some leeway, we’re able to explore the grittier side with the likes of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road to the more gonzo like Mad Max and all of the bootlegs and homages that it inspired!  (And ’70s/’80s Italian post-apocalyptic bootlegs are simply incredible.)  Or go even further with the likes of Adventure Time, especially in the more recent years as the old world was further expanded upon.  Even if settlements are rebuilding the old world and some semblance of stability comes to the wastes, there are still many hazards that roam the blasted out reaches.  Just like the dungeon crawls and treks of D&D fantasy, the world has regressed into an age of buried secrets, monstrous threats, lost knowledge and high adventure!

With that, today I’m going to focus on retooling some old ideas I’ve had for post-apocalyptic settings.  Effects of radiation, as well as enfeebled equipment and ruins of buildings are given some spit and polish.  Plus, I wanted to bring back a fair share of gruesome and ghoulish creatures I had worked on in the past.  Whether it’s an elemental power of radiation itself or the many mutants that is probably created, there are tons of familiar faces.  While I wanted to make a scrapping based craft mechanic, I couldn’t really settle on a base craft mechanic.  To be fair, neither has core D&D really.  And until we have an expanded idea, there are tons of concepts floating throughout the web.  So, I’ll likely come back to that in the future.

Author’s Note: Here’s something I’ve been wanting to do for a while!  In fact, it’s part 1 for that matter.  Expect a heaping helping of horrifying mutants within the next couple of days to next week!  Stay glowing, my radioactive muties!

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July 2017 RPG Blog Carnival: Doomsdays & Dystopias (Dark Genres and Settings)

Abandoned Environment Concept tutorial by maciejkuciara

While I enjoy tons of heroic settings with noble characters ensuring good in the world, I’ve always loved truly grim and dour settings.  I speak of worlds that fit the “GRIMDARK” moniker that’s been affectionately used.  For those who don’t get the reference, it refers to Games Workshop’s Warhammer 40K tagline, which states that “In the grim darkness of the far future, there is only war!”  I’m speaking of places blighted by impossible evils, dystopias where any sort of righteousness and passion is repressed, a sinister universe that is out to destroy you, nuked out wastelands where the remains of society struggle to continue or scrap the last bits of the old ones… but you get the point.

So, why is my theme essentially “dark settings and dark themes”?  Sounds depressing, I know.  After all, spending too much time in an overly dark and oppressive world can wear one down, right?  Not exactly!  There are many reasons why dark settings are truly fascinating.  Before I turn the carnival over to you, let’s take a look at why starker settings can be awesome.  (Or if you prefer, skip down to the bold text.)

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GIANTS – Massive Humanoids for D&D 5th Edition

https://dnd.wizards.com/sites/default/files/media/StormGiant_Gallery_Thumb.jpg

The very word “giant” evokes fear and admiration.  In fact, the creatures known as giants practically invented new definitions for the word, in response to their incredible size.  Giants are titan-like beings born of the world in some manner.  They are raw forces given some manner of thought. One giant alone is an engine of destruction, capable of razing several lands in its wake.  To some giants, we are merely insignificant insects that act as an obstacle to our goals.  They have no inherent malice towards us, we’re just annoying to them.  The Church of the Cosmic Colossal preaches these values, proclaiming that Giants are Cosmic Entities that are far superior to other Material Plane creatures.

To some researchers, they are the first beings who emerged from a lifeless world of nothingness and chaos.  Some even say that they sculpted the world as we know it today.  To some, they’re early creations of the Gods that were in time rejected in favor of the smaller folk.  Perhaps they were once humans who embraced incredible energies of the planes, thus being transformed into massive beings of power.  Like many theories surrounding various creatures, they’re not totally conclusive or have too much evidence to support their truths.  All that is known is that each giant holds their own origin stories and epic tales.  Lest you be a fool, never challenge them on their mythologies.

Author’s Note: GIANTS!  I figured I’d write at least one tie-in to Storm King’s Thunder while the module was still relevant.  Since I’m not as into it as I was with Curse of Strahd, this post won’t likely be expanded into a theme of any sort.  No matter, I wanted to convert some classic giants to D&D 5e and this was my excuse to do so!  In fact, many of these come from some of my favorite settings.  In addition, I converted a giant that was made for a 3E campaign eons ago.  Enjoy.

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Grittier Arms and Armor: Enfeebled Equipment

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Diving into my old and new Dark Sun books (as well as replaying Baldur’s Gate) gives me an interesting idea, a weapon property that characters can obtain (BUT DON’T WANT!)

Feeble: “The quality of you weapon has seriously degraded overtime.  Perhaps the materials that crafted for your weapon were either meant to be temporary or not intended for constant stress.  While wielding this weapon, targets have resistance to its damage.  Targets that have resistance to non-magical weapons are immune to attacks from this weapon.  Furthermore, rolling a Natural 1 on the die destroys this weapon.  In addition, armor with the feeble property grants -1 AC penalty upon any armor above leather.  If a target scores a natural 20 against your armor, it shatters.  However, if either the target or attacker is wielding a feeble weapon and the other has feeble armor, this quality is ignored.  However, the Nat 1/Nat 20 rule still applies.”

Now, this is pretty damn harsh!  How would it be applicable?  Perhaps a recreation of the Iron Crisis/Bhaalspawn saga would work for this?  Maybe the majority of weapons in Athas would carry this trait (considering they’re mostly made of rock and bone, something I can’t imagine taking too much abuse before breaking.)

On top of that, I’d probably replace the Rust Monster’s ability with the ability to make weapons feeble.  Furthermore, if it attacks a feeble weapon, it is automatically destroyed.  5E Rust Monsters are a lot more intimidating than their 4E counterparts, but they’re still not scary.  To be fair, the Tarrasque needs some fun buffs as well.

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